As I described in a recent post, I discovered that my Module::Path module has rather more dependent distributions than I thought. Awareness of this has changed my behaviour, for the good.

Read more ...

CPAN in one sentence

CPANfunny Wed 21 August 2013

This line, taken from the documentation for Class::Tiny, sums up one facet of CPAN perfectly!

Read more ...

The CPAN buddy system

CPANBuddyculturecommunity Fri 16 August 2013

This is an idea for encouraging new contributors to CPAN. When someone uploads their first ever module to CPAN, a volunteer buddy would be assigned. This would be a more experienced CPAN author who would email them "hi, saw your just uploaded your first module — awesome! Let me know if you have any questions, in the meantime here are some good resources about modules, CPAN and the perl community". Of course that could be done automatically, but the human connection would make a lot of difference, I believe.

Read more ...

While working on my adoption metric I've been looking at the number of distributions dependent on each distribution. Today I built the full dependency graph, so I could count the total number of dependencies. Or as ETHER put it: "how many other distributions will you break if you break yours?" It turns out 70% of CPAN distributions aren't used by any other distribution.

Read more ...

Two weeks ago I published a list of CPAN modules that might be candidates for adoption, and described the metric used to score them. I had a lot of comments on that version, which has prompted version 3 of the metric. The key change is the use of gating criteria to decide whether a module should even be considered for the list. The new list contains dists that score at least 5 (out of 14), which is about 4% of the dists on CPAN.

Read more ...

PAUSE supports an informal mechanism for flagging that a module is available to be taken over, or to flag that you'd like help. In this article I'll outline the mechanism, and point out some things to be aware of.

Read more ...

Last week I described a process for adopting a CPAN module. In this post I describe a metric for identifying candidates for adoption. These are essentially modules that have outstanding bugs, haven't been released for a while, and are used by other modules. I've generated a list of the top 1000 adoption candidates according to my current scoring metric. This is very much a work in progress.

Read more ...

Adopt a CPAN module

CPANadoption Wed 24 July 2013

Adopting a module on CPAN is a good way to learn the process of creating, releasing and maintaining a CPAN module. If you fancy the challenge, there are plenty of modules out there with outstanding bugs. Or maybe there's a feature you'd like to add to one of the modules you use? In this post I'll outline the process I've used to adopt modules, then describe each step in more detail. Let me know how this can be improved.

Read more ...

It's all too easy to take CPAN for granted, particularly the modules which just work, and continue to do so year in, year out. Take a moment to thank the author of one of your "go to" modules. I did: he seemed to like it, and it made me feel good too. There's a quest stencil for this on Questhub — give it a go.

Read more ...

Semantic versioning defines a scheme for MAJOR.MINOR.PATCH version numbers. There's a SemVer module on CPAN, and some people have started switching to semantic versioning for their modules. I think this is more complicated than at least 99% of dists need.

Read more ...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14